Published Online:https://doi.org/10.5465/amr.1989.4279078

This article develops a conceptual framework and identifies six perspectives of fit—fit as moderation, fit as mediation, fit as matching, fit as gestalts, fit as profile deviation, and fit as covariation—each implying distinct theoretical meanings and requiring the use of specific analytical schemes. These six perspectives highlight the isomorphic nature of the correspondence between a particular concept and its subsequent testing scheme(s), but it appears that researchers have used these perspectives interchangeably, often invoking one perspective in the theoretical discussion while employing another in the empirical research. Because such research practices weaken the critical link between theory development and theory testing, this article argues for explicit links between theoretical propositions and operational tests.

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